Using OpenData to help drivers navigate NYC
Track and analyze parking tickets and camera violations using data provided by the New York City Department of Finance (DOF), now available through NYC OpenData.
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While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 

This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 


This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.


View DCP’s Population Projections.


Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 


Visit the NYC Open Data portal.

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Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 

In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”

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Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 


In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”


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In addition to using NYC OpenData in his own work (see more visualizations on his blog, I Quant NY), Ben employs public data from the NYC OpenData portal in his statistics classes at Pratt. Bringing open data into the classroom allows his students to explore their city and analyze information that’s relevant to their interests as urban planners, whether transportation, health inspection, education or other data. 


Check out Ben’s work on Citywide recycling patterns here.


Check out Ben’s work on Street Suffixes here. 


View more open data on the NYC OpenData Portal. 

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The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

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New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.

Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.


Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

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The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills

So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.

The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills


So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.


Thanks to BetaNYC for hosting this year’s #CodeAcross NYC civic technology hackathon and inspiring tools like this.

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This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson


Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

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Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 

Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   

Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 


Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   





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DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.

Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation

DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.


Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation


Graffiti Information, Department of Sanitation


Lost Property Contact Information, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Active Medallion Drivers, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Authorized Medallion Vehicles, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Seasonal Flu Vaccine Locations, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


Farmers Markets, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


NYC REACH (Regional Electronic Adoption Center for Health) Participants, Department of Health & Mental Hygiene


Visit the NYC OpenData portal at nyc.gov/data to access these new datasets and much more. 


Photo credit: littleny

How NYC is using data to fight fires

The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: ”How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining”

Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

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The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: ”How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining”


Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

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Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.

Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more 

Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.


Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more 

Featuring the final winners of #Reinvent311: Pediacities & FeedNYC

Today we’re featuring the two final winners of the #Reinvent311 competition. Pediacities won for the best integration of the 311 Content API into an existing mobile tool, app or website and FeedNYC was the Judge’s Pick. 

Pediacities

Today we’re featuring the two final winners of the #Reinvent311 competition. Pediacities won for the best integration of the 311 Content API into an existing mobile tool, app or website and FeedNYC was the Judge’s Pick. 


Pediacities


These former winners of the NYC BigApps competition came to the #Reinvent311 challenge to share their NYCPedia neighborhoods platform, a data encyclopedia about New York City where users can search by neighborhood or zip code to find local community facilities, services, demographic information, news, and events. This neighborhood profile incorporates 7,344 city facilities. To develop their community pages Pediacities used the Open311 API and the GeoSupport Client API.  image


FeedNYC


Jacob Budin’s FeedNYC mobile web app locates food pantries, soup kitchens and senior centers by neighborhood, or by the day or time that an individual is looking for assistance. The clean interface and clear user experience draws information from Open311 API and the Food Bank for New York City. Find out more about FeedNYC on Jacob’s website.


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Winners of #311 Mobile Content Challenge

Today we’re featuring two of the five #Reinvent311 competition winners. Apartment Report was awarded best presentation of 311 information on a specific topic and Homeless Helper for best presentation of 311 information targeting a specific audience. 

Apartment Report

Today we’re featuring two of the five #Reinvent311 competition winners. Apartment Report was awarded best presentation of 311 information on a specific topic and Homeless Helper for best presentation of 311 information targeting a specific audience. 


Apartment Report


Robert Dunning started his presentation by asking how many people in the room had rented an apartment – as expected, nearly every hand rose. His project, Apartment Report, provides instant access to information about properties across the five boroughs. By combining Google Maps and Google Street View with City data such as the Department of Buildings violations, Housing Preservation & Development violations, 311 complaints at a property, bedbug registry, school zone search, and NYC Finance data, Apartment NYC reveals the important, invisible story of a property, enabling renters to make informed choices.


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Homeless Helper


Developed by Rasmi Elasmar, Homeless Helper is an app aimed at helping homeless persons in need. In addition to providing critical information such as the locations of food pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters.

#Reinvent311 Mobile Content Challenge

In a City where 70% of 311 calls are resolved simply by providing information, the #Reinvent311 challenge asked civic technologists to develop mobile tools to provide 311 information more quickly and effectively. On January 15, #Reinvent311 finalists from across the city came together to share the tools they developed using the 311 Content API, the 311 Service Request dataset and other open City data. From a searchable index of all City facilities to a comprehensive “Apartment Report,” these tools affirmed the depth and breadth of 311 content and demonstrated new mobile opportunities for 311 content delivery. Thanks to all of the participants for their work and to the sponsors, NYC 311, NYC Digital, NYC DoITT, Stack Exchange and Code for America/BetaNYC!

Photo courtesy of @aribajahan

In a City where 70% of 311 calls are resolved simply by providing information, the #Reinvent311 challenge asked civic technologists to develop mobile tools to provide 311 information more quickly and effectively. On January 15, #Reinvent311 finalists from across the city came together to share the tools they developed using the 311 Content API, the 311 Service Request dataset and other open City data. From a searchable index of all City facilities to a comprehensive “Apartment Report,” these tools affirmed the depth and breadth of 311 content and demonstrated new mobile opportunities for 311 content delivery. Thanks to all of the participants for their work and to the sponsors, NYC 311, NYC Digital, NYC DoITT, Stack Exchange and Code for America/BetaNYC!


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Photo courtesy of @aribajahan


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 Photo courtesy of @nycdigital


Today we’re featuring one of the five competition winners. NYC Cares was selected for the best presentation of 311 information on a mobile platform. Stay tuned for upcoming posts on other #Reinvent311 mobile tools!


NYC Cares: Developers, Chris Smith and Aileen Smith of Vizalytics introduced a unique approach for sharing 311 information for food insecure individuals. After identifying seniors as a user group in need of improved access to 311 information, they developed their app, NYC Cares, provides a geographically sorted list of nearby food pantries and shelters, which individuals can use to find services. NYC Cares also allows users to send a simple SMS text of their search results to an individual in need, thereby enabling NYC residents to help each other by providing and sharing 311 information.  Check out a video on NYC Cares here.

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nycdoitt:

Visit the new NYC Business Atlas, an interactive map launched by DoITT, the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, and the Departments of Small Business Services. This new tool helps small businesses better understand the economic conditions in their neighborhoods by combining information on population demographics with business filings, tax receipts, and pedestrian activity. Available at maps.nyc.gov/businessatlas/ – the Business Atlas enables local businesses to make better decisions about where to open their doors and how to operate

nycdoitt:



Visit the new NYC Business Atlas, an interactive map launched by DoITT, the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, and the Departments of Small Business Services. This new tool helps small businesses better understand the economic conditions in their neighborhoods by combining information on population demographics with business filings, tax receipts, and pedestrian activity. Available at maps.nyc.gov/businessatlas/ – the Business Atlas enables local businesses to make better decisions about where to open their doors and how to operate


According to NYC Chief Analytics Officer Mike Flowers: “This project is an extension of the City’s Open Data efforts. Data transparency means better information for those that live and work in our neighborhoods, and that means more than just raw numbers. The Business Atlas is an easy-to-use visualization that shows that you don’t need to be a data scientist to make good use of NYC data.”


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Check out this 3D visualization showing the location and density of Manhattan’s street trees. Ken Steif created the map using NYC Parks tree census data available via NYC OpenData. 

Get Manhattan Tree Census Data

Check out this 3D visualization showing the location and density of Manhattan’s street trees. Ken Steif created the map using NYC Parks tree census data available via NYC OpenData. 


Get Manhattan Tree Census Data

Reinvent 311: Mobile Content Challenge

nycdigital:

Did you know that 311 gets 65,000 inquiries a day?

nycdigital:



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Did you know that 311 gets 65,000 inquiries a day?


Hosted by The City of New York, Code for America and Stack Exchange, we are inviting urban technologists, content creators, media professionals, civic developers and interested hackers to partner with NYC 311 and help make vital customer service information accessible on the web and through mobile devices.


Help us Reinvent 311. Register now for the Reinvent 311 mobile content challenge from November 26 - January 15, 2014: http://on.nyc.gov/Reinvent311


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Interested in learning how people are using NYC OpenData? Visit NYC OpenData Analytics for info on page views, and a running count of datasets, maps, and charts available on the OpenData portal.  Additionally, the analytics tool shows the most viewed datasets, the top referrers to the portal, search terms and embeds, providing a comprehensive picture of the types of NYC data being used each day.

Check out other open data program analytics:

Interested in learning how people are using NYC OpenData? Visit NYC OpenData Analytics for info on page views, and a running count of datasets, maps, and charts available on the OpenData portal.  Additionally, the analytics tool shows the most viewed datasets, the top referrers to the portal, search terms and embeds, providing a comprehensive picture of the types of NYC data being used each day.


Check out other open data program analytics:


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Tracking NYC OpenData Progress

Check out the NYC OpenData Dashboard to explore the datasets City agencies have released and plan to release moving forward. Discover new datasets and how frequently they are updated. Quickly sort by agency and available dataset or download data and learn more more about the information New York City is releasing to the public. 

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Check out the NYC OpenData Dashboard to explore the datasets City agencies have released and plan to release moving forward. Discover new datasets and how frequently they are updated. Quickly sort by agency and available dataset or download data and learn more more about the information New York City is releasing to the public. 

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Each year, 80,000 NYC 8th grade students apply to high school choosing from more than 700 options. Yesterday, the NYC Department of Education’s Innovation team (iZone) held the School Choice Design Challenge Demo Night featuring new apps aimed at helping families navigate the admissions process.

Each year, 80,000 NYC 8th grade students apply to high school choosing from more than 700 options. Yesterday, the NYC Department of Education’s Innovation team (iZone) held the School Choice Design Challenge Demo Night featuring new apps aimed at helping families navigate the admissions process.



For the challenge, Pediacities, former NYC BigApps winners and data platform providers, created a set of public APIs (data integration tools), so developers could easily integrate NYC high school data into their applications. Six apps are now live helping students discover the best school based on criteria like location, extracurricular activities, or entrance requirements.


Image: FindTheBest  - the SCDC winning app selected by a panel of 9th grade students as part of the School Choice Design Challenge. 

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New York City’s air quality has reached the cleanest levels in more than 50 years. According to the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, between 1990 and 2012, the global share of CO2 emissions from industrialized countries fell from 69% to 41%. At the same time, the share from developing countries is rapidly rising.

Check out this animated visualization of global CO2 emissions created by The World Bank

New York City’s air quality has reached the cleanest levels in more than 50 years. According to the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, between 1990 and 2012, the global share of CO2 emissions from industrialized countries fell from 69% to 41%. At the same time, the share from developing countries is rapidly rising.


Check out this animated visualization of global CO2 emissions created by The World Bank


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Data from various sources including The UNThe World BankThe IMF.


Access NYC environmental open data