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New York City is home to more than 65 different types of street trees ranging from the Alder to Zelkova. With over 600,000 street trees across the five boroughs, one might wonder where they are and which types are most common. Using NYC Open Data of street trees, a few local designers decided to find out… According to their analysis, Queens is home to a third of the city’s street trees and the Maple and Plane Tree (Sycamore) are the most common.

To learn more, check out their Interactive Visualization of NYC Street Trees.  

New York City is home to more than 65 different types of street trees ranging from the Alder to Zelkova. With over 600,000 street trees across the five boroughs, one might wonder where they are and which types are most common. Using NYC Open Data of street trees, a few local designers decided to find out… According to their analysis, Queens is home to a third of the city’s street trees and the Maple and Plane Tree (Sycamore) are the most common.




To learn more, check out their Interactive Visualization of NYC Street Trees.  


Interested in NYC tree planting? Visit MillionTreesNYC


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New York City becomes even more beautiful when the sun begins to set. Every day, there is a moment when the sun fits perfectly between buildings, so that rays of light reflect among the skyscrapers.

Twice a year, when the sun aligns with the east-west midtown street grid it creates a phenomenon known as “Manhattanhenge.” Yet it’s possible to experience henge events during every sunset all over the city. Last year, using data from NYC Open Street Maps (OSM) and various technologies, folks at CartoDB created a map that locates every “NYChenge” that occurs in New York City every single day.

New York City becomes even more beautiful when the sun begins to set. Every day, there is a moment when the sun fits perfectly between buildings, so that rays of light reflect among the skyscrapers.




Twice a year, when the sun aligns with the east-west midtown street grid it creates a phenomenon known as “Manhattanhenge.” Yet it’s possible to experience henge events during every sunset all over the city. Last year, using data from NYC Open Street Maps (OSM) and various technologies, folks at CartoDB created a map that locates every “NYChenge” that occurs in New York City every single day.


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Exploring urban data through New York City subway maps 

Tunnel Vision NYC, a new app created by Bill Lindmeier as a thesis project at ITP / NYU, layers data from the MTA and U.S. Census Bureau on MTA subway maps. Simply point your phone at the map to see data visualizations of turnstile activity, rent prices, income and more. 

Exploring urban data through New York City subway maps 


Tunnel Vision NYC, a new app created by Bill Lindmeier as a thesis project at ITP / NYU, layers data from the MTA and U.S. Census Bureau on MTA subway maps. Simply point your phone at the map to see data visualizations of turnstile activity, rent prices, income and more. 


Get the Tunnel Vision NYC app 
Register for MTA datafeeds
Download NYC population by census tract data on NYC OpenData

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This data visualization by Andrew Hill displays vehicle collisions aggregated by time of day using recently released NYPD motor vehicle collision data.  


This data visualization by Andrew Hill displays vehicle collisions aggregated by time of day using recently released NYPD motor vehicle collision data.  


Mayor de Blasio has set the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities in New York City. We’re looking to the civic tech community to help us achieve that vision.



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Sarah Kaufman of New York University’s Rudin Center for Transportation recently analyzed six months of Citi Bike subscriber data. Her results, shown on this map, illustrate a striking difference in ridership. Kaufman writes: “of the top ten stations for each gender, women preferred the Brooklyn residential neighborhoods of Fort Greene and Clinton Hill, while men were overwhelmingly represented in bustling Manhattan."  Currently 32% of Citi Bike riders are women and 68% are men. 

Read Sarah Kaufman’s post about Citi Bike and gender 

Sarah Kaufman of New York University’s Rudin Center for Transportation recently analyzed six months of Citi Bike subscriber data. Her results, shown on this map, illustrate a striking difference in ridership. Kaufman writes: “of the top ten stations for each gender, women preferred the Brooklyn residential neighborhoods of Fort Greene and Clinton Hill, while men were overwhelmingly represented in bustling Manhattan."  Currently 32% of Citi Bike riders are women and 68% are men. 


Read Sarah Kaufman’s post about Citi Bike and gender 


View Citi Bike data here 


View the Citi Bike challenge for NYC BigApps and affiliated data on the BigApps page of the NYC OpenData portal 

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NYC OpenData powers the annual NYC BigApps Competition. From May to September, hundreds of top developers, entrepreneurs, thought leaders, designers, makers, and marketers will convene at events across the City to address civic challenges through technology. The NYC OpenData portal is home to a number of helpful public and private datasets from nonprofits, City agencies, and other organizations, all selected to support the BigApps development process. To access these datasets, visit the NYC BigApps data catalog. To learn more about the BigApps competition, visit the official NYC BigApps website.

NYC OpenData powers the annual NYC BigApps Competition. From May to September, hundreds of top developers, entrepreneurs, thought leaders, designers, makers, and marketers will convene at events across the City to address civic challenges through technology. The NYC OpenData portal is home to a number of helpful public and private datasets from nonprofits, City agencies, and other organizations, all selected to support the BigApps development process. To access these datasets, visit the NYC BigApps data catalog. To learn more about the BigApps competition, visit the official NYC BigApps website.

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Check out the latest mashup of NYC parking ticket data with parking fines by Alihan Polat/Studio M+

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

Check out the latest mashup of NYC parking ticket data with parking fines by Alihan Polat/Studio M+


Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

NYC Collaboration with OpenStreetMap

The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.


The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.


The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.


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Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.

Reblogged from nychealth:

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.


Reblogged from nychealth:


Noise in NYC


Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.


Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.


To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:


  • 4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 

  • 3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.

  • More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:


  • 111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.

  • More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.

  • 1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.

  • 311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.

  • Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

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While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning’s Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 

This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning’s Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 


This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.


View DCP’s Population Projections.


Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 


Visit the NYC Open Data portal.


Update April 17, 2014: DCP has released revised population predictions through 2040 on the NYC Open Data portal

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Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 

In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”

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Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 


In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”


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In addition to using NYC OpenData in his own work (see more visualizations on his blog, I Quant NY), Ben employs public data from the NYC OpenData portal in his statistics classes at Pratt. Bringing open data into the classroom allows his students to explore their city and analyze information that’s relevant to their interests as urban planners, whether transportation, health inspection, education or other data. 


Check out Ben’s work on Citywide recycling patterns here.


Check out Ben’s work on Street Suffixes here. 


View more open data on the NYC OpenData Portal. 

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The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

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New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.

Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s “Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity” dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.


Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s “Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity” dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

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The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills

So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.

The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills


So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.


Thanks to BetaNYC for hosting this year’s #CodeAcross NYC civic technology hackathon and inspiring tools like this.

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This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson


Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

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Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 

Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   

Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 


Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   





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DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.

Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation

DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.


Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation


Graffiti Information, Department of Sanitation


Lost Property Contact Information, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Active Medallion Drivers, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Authorized Medallion Vehicles, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Seasonal Flu Vaccine Locations, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


Farmers Markets, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


NYC REACH (Regional Electronic Adoption Center for Health) Participants, Department of Health & Mental Hygiene


Visit the NYC OpenData portal at nyc.gov/data to access these new datasets and much more. 


Photo credit: littleny

How NYC is using data to fight fires

The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: "How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining"

Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

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The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: "How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining"


Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

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Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.

Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more 

Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.


Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more